Thursday, May 21, 2020

What Are Sedimentary Rocks

Sedimentary rocks are the second great rock class. Whereas igneous rocks are born hot, sedimentary rocks are born cool at the Earths surface, mostly under water. They usually consist of layers or strata; hence they are also called stratified rocks. Depending on what theyre made of, sedimentary rocks fall into one of three types. How to Tell Sedimentary Rocks The main thing about sedimentary rocks is that they were once sediment — mud and sand and gravel and clay — and were not greatly changed as they turned into rock. The following traits are all related to that. Theyre generally arranged in layers of sandy or clayey material (strata) like those youll see in excavations or a hole dug in a sand dune.Theyre usually the color of sediment, that is, light brown to light gray.They may preserve signs of life and surface activity, like fossils, tracks, ripple marks and so on. Clastic Sedimentary Rocks The most common set of sedimentary rocks consists of the granular materials that occur in sediment. Sediment mostly consists of surface minerals  Ã¢â‚¬â€ quartz and clays — that are made by the physical breakdown and chemical alteration of rocks. These are carried away by water or the  wind and laid down in a different place. Sediment may also include pieces of stones and shells and other objects, not just grains of pure minerals. Geologists use the word clasts to denote particles of all these kinds, and rocks made of clasts are called clastic rocks. Look around you at where the worlds clastic sediment goes: sand and mud are carried down rivers to the sea, mostly. Sand is made of quartz, and mud is made of clay minerals. As these sediments are steadily buried over geologic time, they get packed together under pressure and low heat, not much more than 100 C. In these conditions the sediment is cemented into rock: sand becomes sandstone and clay become  shale. If gravel or pebbles are part of the sediment, the rock that forms is conglomerate. If the rock is broken and recemented together, it is called breccia. Its worth noting that some rocks commonly lumped in the igneous category are actually sedimentary. Tuff is consolidated ash that has fallen from the air in volcanic eruptions, making it just as sedimentary as a marine claystone. There is some movement in the profession to recognize this truth. Organic Sedimentary Rocks Another type of sediment actually arises in the sea as microscopic organisms — plankton — build shells out of dissolved calcium carbonate or silica. Dead plankton steadily shower their dust-sized shells onto the seafloor, where they accumulate in thick layers. That material turns to two more rock types, limestone (carbonate) and chert (silica). These are called organic sedimentary rocks, although theyre not made of organic material as a chemist would define it. Another type of sediment forms where dead plant material builds up into thick layers. With a small degree of compaction, this becomes peat; after much longer and deeper burial, it becomes coal. Coal and peat are organic in both the geological and the chemical sense. Although peat is forming in parts of the world today, the great beds of coal that we mine formed during past ages in enormous swamps. There are no coal swamps around today  because conditions do not favor them. The sea needs to be much higher. Most of the time, geologically speaking, the sea is hundreds of meters higher than today, and most of the continents are shallow seas. Thats why we have sandstone, limestone, shale and coal over most of the central United States and elsewhere on the worlds continents. (Sedimentary rocks also become exposed when the land rises. This is common around the edges of the Earths lithospheric plates. Chemical Sedimentary Rocks These same ancient shallow seas sometimes allowed large areas to become isolated and begin drying up. In that setting, as the seawater grows more concentrated, minerals begin to come out of solution (precipitate), starting with calcite, then gypsum, then halite. The resulting rocks are certain limestones, gypsum rock, and rock salt respectively. These rocks, called the evaporite sequence, are also part of the sedimentary clan. In some cases, chert can also form by precipitation. This usually happens below the sediment surface, where different fluids can circulate and interact chemically. Diagenesis: Underground Changes All kinds of sedimentary rocks are subject to further changes during their stay underground. Fluids may penetrate them and change their chemistry; low temperatures and moderate pressures may change some of the minerals into other minerals. These processes, which are gentle and do not deform the rocks, are called diagenesis as opposed to metamorphism (although there is no well-defined boundary between the two). The most important types of diagenesis involve the formation of dolomite mineralization in limestones, the formation of petroleum and of higher grades of coal, and the formation of many types of ore bodies. The industrially important zeolite minerals also form by diagenetic processes. Sedimentary Rocks Are Stories You can see that each type of sedimentary rock has a story behind it. The beauty of sedimentary rocks is that their strata are full of clues to what the past world was like. Those clues might be fossils or sedimentary structures such as marks left by water currents, mud cracks or more subtle features seen under the microscope or in the lab. From these clues we know that most sedimentary rocks are of marine origin, usually forming in shallow seas. But some sedimentary rocks formed on land: clastic rocks made on the bottoms of large freshwater lakes or as accumulations of desert sand, organic rocks in peat bogs or lake beds, and evaporites in playas. These are called continental or terrigenous (land-formed) sedimentary rocks. Sedimentary rocks are rich in geologic history of a special kind. While igneous and metamorphic rocks also have stories, they involve the deep Earth and require intensive work to decipher. But in sedimentary rocks, you can recognize, in very direct ways, what the world  was like in the geologic past.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Intelligent Design Versus Aquinas Motion And Causation

Intelligent Design versus Aquinas Motion and Causation Intelligent design Theory The theory of intelligent design theory holds that an intelligent cause and not an indirect process best explain the nature of living things and the universal features. The theory appreciates that, for the existence of the universe and the living things in it, there must have been in existence an intelligent force. The theorist are not out to show proof of the intelligent designer or who the intelligent designer ought to be. Intelligent designers make an observation and subsequent inferences on intelligent agents actions and the resultants complexities. The inferences and observations are accessed against information obtained in the natural process concluding life is an intelligent design ADDIN EN.CITE Dawes200748067(Dawes 67)48048017Dawes, Gregory W.What Is Wrong with Intelligent Design?International Journal for Philosophy of ReligionInternational Journal for Philosophy of Religion69-816122007Springer( HYPERLINK l _ENREF_2 o Dawes, 2007 #480 Dawes 67). Aquinas Motion and Causation Aquinas a Dominican priest, philosopher and theologian strongly opposed the traditional creation doctrine supported by Christian. Aquinas rose to defend the when conflict arose between natural changes and nature of creation. His doctrine teaches that there ought to be a distinction between the two implying, bringing to being is a cause to natural change. The art of bringing to being is a cause

Indicators of Employees Motivation Free Essays

string(71) " or arbitration panel shall proceed to hear and determine the dispute\." |[pic] | |List  of  Members | | | |[pic] | |Functions  and  Independence | | | |[pic] | |Industrial  Relations | | | |[pic] | |Staff | | | |[pic] | Complaint  Form | | | |[pic] | |The  Labour  Act  2003,  (ACT  651) | | | |[pic] | |Regulations  of  the  NLC  Ã¢â‚¬â€œÃ‚  NATIONAL  LABO| |UR  COMMISSION  (NLC) | | | |[pic] | |List  of  Mediators | | | |[pic] | Code  of  Conduct | | | |[pic] | |Inuagural  Address | | | |[pic] | |Picture  Gallery | | | |[pic] | |Annual  Report | | | |[pic] | |List  of  Members | | | |[pic] | |Functions  and  Independence | | |[pic] | |Industrial  Relations | | | |[pic] | |Staff | | | |[pic] | |Complaint  Form | | | |[pic] | |The  Labour  Act  2003,  (ACT  651) | | | |[pic] | Regulations  of  the  NLC  Ã¢â‚¬â€œÃ‚  NATIONAL  LABO| |UR  COMMISSION  (NLC) | | | |[pic] | |List  of  Mediators | | | |[pic] | |Code  of  Conduct | | | |[pic] | |Inuagural  Address | | | |[pic] | |Picture  Gallery | | | |[pic] | |Annual  Report | | | Top of Form [pic] [pi|[pic] |[pi| |c] |[pic] |c] | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |   | | | |[pic]November 13, 2011November 09, 2011 | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |Website Design: CON-IMEDIA | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pi c] | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |Website Design: CON-IMEDIA | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |NATIONAL LA BOUR COMMISSION REGULATIONS, 2006 L. I. 1822 | | | |  IN exercise of the powers conferred on the Commission under section 152 of the Labour Act, 2003 (Act 651) these Regulations are made this 1st day of February, 2006. We will write a custom essay sample on Indicators of Employees Motivation or any similar topic only for you Order Now | | | |   | | | |   Negotiation procedures | | | |   | | | |Negotiation in good faith. | | | |1. Parties to an industrial dispute shall negotiate in good faith in the first instance to resolve the dispute in accordance with the dispute settlement procedures established in their respective Collective Agreements or Contracts of Employment. | | | |   | | | |Time for concluding negotiations. | | | |The Negotiation shall be concluded within seven working days after the occurrence of the dispute. | | | |   | | | |3. Records of Negotiation Process. | | | |The parties shall keep written records of the negotiation process and outcome signed by both parties. | | |Where the parties cannot agree to sign a consensus record together, each party may present its own record duly signed. | | | |   | | | |Failure to resolve dispute by Negotiation. | | | |4. If the dispute remains unresolved after seven working days, either party shall refer it to the Commission for the appointment of a mediator. | | | |   | | | |Failure to exhaust procedures in Collective Agreement. | | |Where the Commis sion is satisfied that the parties have not exhausted the procedures established in the Collective Agreement or have not agreed to waive those procedures, the Commission shall order the parties to comply with those procedures within the time as determined by | | | |the Commission. | | | |   | | | |   Mediation procedures | | | |   | | | |Complaint to be in writing. | | | |The Complainant shall submit a written complaint to the Commission or complete Form ‘A’ (Complainant Form) specified in the Schedule to the Regulations and submit it to the Commission. | | |   | | | |Time within which to respond to Complaint. | | | |(1) The Commission shall within three (3) working days serve the other party with a copy of the complaint and request the other party to the dispute to respond to the complaint in writing within fourteen (14) working days of the receipt of the Commission’s request. | | | |(2) Where a party to a dispute fails to respond to the request of the Commission   Ã‚  within the stipulated period of fourteen working days, the Commission shall send a final notice to the party concerned to respond within a further seven working days after which the Commission | | | |shall proceed to determine the case. | | |Choice of Mediator | | | |After receipt of the response in regulation 7, the Commission shall provide both parties the list of mediators for the parties to make a selection of a mediator or mediators. | | | |Appointment of Mediator | | | |The Commission shall appoint the mediator or mediators jointly chosen by the parties to mediate in the dispute. | | | |Failure to agree on choice of mediator | | | |Where the parties to a dispute fail to agree on a choice of mediator the Commission shall, within two (2) working days, appoint a mediator or mediators as the case may be to mediate the dispute. | | |   | | | |Time within which to conclude mediation | | | |The mediation shall be concluded within fourteen days after the date o f appointment of the mediator. | | | |   | | | |Dispute settled through mediation | | | |(1) Where at the end of the mediation there is a settlement of the dispute, the terms of settlement shall be recorded and signed by the mediator and the parties to the dispute. | | |   | | | |(2) A copy of the signed terms of settlement shall be lodged with the  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Commission. | | | |   | | | |Binding Settlement | | | |The settlement referred to in regulation 12 shall be binding on the parties. | | | |   | | | |Duty to cooperate in mediation efforts | | | |The parties to the mediation process shall cooperate in the mediation efforts. | | |   | | | |Failure to settle through mediation | | | |Where there is no settlement at the end of the mediation process the mediator shall immediately declare the dispute as unresolved and refer the dispute to the Commission within three days for Voluntary Arbitration. | | | |Conflict of interest. | | | |A mediator shall disc lose in writing, any interest whatsoever nature in a dispute referred for mediation. | | | |Upon consideration of such interest by the Commission, the mediator may be changed unless the parties to the dispute consent in writing to retain the mediator. | | |   Voluntary arbitration | | | |   | | | |Reference to voluntary arbitration | | | |Where a dispute is referred to the Commission under regulation 15, the Commission shall with the consent of the parties refer the dispute to an arbitrator or an arbitration panel for voluntary arbitration. | | | |   | | | |Failure to agree on choice of arbitrator | | | |Where the parties to a voluntary arbitration fail to agree on the appointment of an arbitrator or an arbitration panel, the Commission shall, within three working days, appoint an arbitrator or arbitration panel. | | | |Disclosure of interest. | | |An arbitrator shall disclose in writing, any interest whatsoever nature the arbitrator may have in a dispute referred for volunt ary arbitration. | | | |Upon consideration of such interest by the Commission, the arbitrator may be changed unless the parties to the dispute consent in writing to waive this option. | | | |Time within which to submit statement of issues or questions in dispute | | | |Within three (3) working days after the appointment of an arbitrator or arbitration panel, the parties to an industrial dispute shall submit to the arbitrator in writing a statement of the issues or questions in dispute signed by one or more of the parties or their | | | |representatives. | | |   | | | |Failure or refusal to sign a statement of issues or questions in a dispute. | | | |Where a party to a dispute fails or refuses to sign a statement as required in regulation 20, the statement may be submitted without that party’s signature. | | | |A statement pursuant to sub-regulation (1) shall state that the other party has failed or refused to sign the statement and the Commission shall authorize the arbitra tor to proceed with the arbitration despite the fact that only one party has signed the statement of the issue. | | | |Failure to appear before an arbitrator | | |If any party fails to appear before the arbitrator or arbitration panel after the expiration of seven (7) working days after being notified, the arbitrator or arbitration panel shall proceed to hear and determine the dispute. You read "Indicators of Employees Motivation" in category "Papers" | | | |   | | | |Time within which to conclude voluntary arbitration | | | |The voluntary arbitration process shall be concluded within fourteen (14) working days from the date of appointment of the arbitrator or arbitration panel or within the extra time determined by the Commission. | | |   | | | |Voluntary Arbitration award binding | | | |The decision of the arbitrator or a majority of the arbitrators shall be binding on all the parties. | | | |Arbitration award to be communicated | | | |   | | | |The arbitrator or arbitrati on panel shall within seven working days of the last sitting make an award and communicate the award to the parties and the Commission within seventy-two hours. | | |   Compulsory arbitration | | | |   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Compulsory arbitration by the Commission | | | |If a dispute remains unresolved within seven (7) working days after the commencement of a strike or lock out, the dispute shall be settled by compulsory arbitration by the Commission. | | | |   | | | |Content of notice to be served by the Commission | | | |27 (1) Where a dispute is referred to the Commission under Clause 26, the Commission shall serve a notice on the parties; | | | |   | | | |(a)   stating what in its opinion the unresolved issues are between the parties and | | | |   | | | |(b)   asking the parties whether they agree to those issues | | | |   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   (2)   the parties shall respond within three (3) working days. | | | |   | | | |Composition of Compulsory Arbitration Panel | | | |28. A compulsory arbitration shall comprise three members of the Commission, one member each representing Government, Organized Labour and Employers Organization. | | | |   | | | |Time within which to conclude compulsory arbitration | | | |The compulsory arbitration process shall be concluded within fourteen (14) working days after service of the notice in regulation 27. | | | |   | | | |Compulsory Arbitration Award binding | | | |The award of the majority of the arbitrators in a compulsory arbitration shall be binding on the parties. | | |   | | | |Publication of compulsory arbitration award in Gazette | | | |A compulsory arbitration award shall immediately on completion, be published in the Gazette and other state media by the Commission and copies shall be given to the parties to the dispute. | | | |   | | | |Appeals against compulsory arbitration award | | | |Appeals against a compulsory arbitration award shall lie to the Court of Appeal on questions of law only within seven (7) working days after the publication of the award under regulation 31. | | |   | | | |Summary settlement of dispute by the Commission. | | | |(1). After the receipt of a complaint in accordance with regulation 6 and a response to the complaint in accordance with Clause 7, the Commission may, after giving the parties to the dispute the right to be heard, settle the dispute summarily without recourse to mediation or | | | |arbitration. | | | |   | | | |(2). Where a party to a dispute fails to respond to a complaint in accordance with regulation 7, the Commission may determine the complaint without recourse to that party and the decision of the Commission shall be binding on the parties to the dispute. | | |   | | | |(3)   The Commission may re-open a dispute which has been determined under sub-regulation (2) if a party to the dispute on application within fourteen working days after the determination of the case provides reasonable explanation for the failure to respond to the complaint. | | | |Procedures for resolving disputes from essential services | | | |   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Dispute Resolution in Essential Services | | | |Parties to an industrial dispute in essential services shall endeavour to settle the dispute within three (3) days after the occurrence of the dispute by negotiation. | | |   | | | |Referral to the Commission after failure to resolve dispute | | | |If the dispute remains unresolved after the expiration of the three (3) days referred to in regulation 34, the parties shall within the next working day refer the dispute to the Commission for settlement by compulsory arbitration. | | | |   | | | |Compulsory arbitration by the Commission | | | |The Commission shall, not later than three (3) working days after the dispute has been referred to it, constitute a compulsory arbitration panel to settle the dispute by compulsory arbitration within fourteen working days. | | |   Strikes and lockout procedures | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Notice of intention to strike or lockout | | | |Where | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   (a) the parties fail to agree to refer a dispute for voluntary arbitration, or   | | | |(b) a dispute remains unresolved at the end of the arbitration proceedings, either party intending to take a strike action or lockout, shall give written notice of the intended action to the other party and the Commission shall, within seven (7) working days after the failure | | | |of the parties to agree to refer the dispute to another arbitration, terminate the arbitration proceedings. | | |   | | | |Time within which strike or lockout action can be undertaken | | | |Strike action or lockout may be undertaken after the expiration of seven (7) working days from the date of the notice referred to in regulation 37 and not at anytime before the expiration of that period. | | | |  Effective date of notice of strike or lockout | | | |The sev en (7) working days referred in regulation 38 shall begin to run from the date of receipt of the notice by the Commission. | | |   | | | |Prohibition of strike or lockout in respect of essential services | | | |  An employer carrying on, or a worker engaged in an essential service shall not resort to a lockout or strike in connection with or in furtherance of an industrial dispute in which workers in the essential service are involved. | | | |   | | | |Cooling-off period | | | |A party to an industrial dispute shall not resort to a strike or lockout during the period when negotiation, mediation or arbitration proceedings are in progress. | | |   | | | |Procedures for maintaining a database of mediators and arbitrators and fees | | | |   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   List of mediators and arbitrators | | | |The Commission shall maintain a list of industrial relations mediators or arbitrators who meet the criteria of the Commission. | | | |   | | | |Application to be li sted as mediator or arbitrator | | | |  A person who seeks to be listed as a mediator or arbitrator shall complete and submit an application form which may be obtained from the Commission. | | |   | | | |Mediators and Arbitrators not employees of Commission | | | |A person appointed as mediator or arbitrator of the Commission does not become employee of the Commission. | | | | | | | |Disqualified mediator or arbitrator | | | |A person appointed as a mediator or arbitrator is not qualified to serve in that capacity if the person has a financial or other interest in the undertaking or employers’ or workers’ organization involved in the dispute, unless the parties to the dispute agree to the | | | |appointment in writing despite the disclosure of the interest. | | |   | | | |Removal from the list of mediators and arbitrators | | | |A person   listed as a mediator or arbitrator may be removed from the list by the Commission on the grounds that the person; | | | |   | | | |(a)  Ã‚  Ã‚     no longer satisfies the criteria for admission | | | |   | | | |(b)   has been repeatedly or flagrantly delinquent in submitting reports to the Commission | | | |   | | | |(c)  Ã‚  Ã‚   has refused to make reasonable and periodic reports in a timely manner to the Commission concerning activities relating to mediation or arbitration. | | |   | | | |(d)   has been the subject of complaints by parties who use the services of the Commission after appropriate enquiry has established a just cause for cancellation, or | | | |   | | | |(e)  Ã‚  Ã‚   has died | | | |   | | | |Notice for removal of mediators and arbitrators | | |A mediator or arbitrator listed on the database may only be removed after thirty days notice. | | | |   | | | |Voluntary withdrawal from list of mediators or arbitrators. | | | |A person listed as a mediator and or arbitrator by the Commission may withdraw from the list at any time by giving the Commission thi rty (30) days notice in writing. | | | |   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚     Ã‚  49. Mediation and voluntary arbitration fees | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚     Fees shall be in conformity with Government Consultancy rates obtained  from  the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning. | | |   | | | |   | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   | | | |SCHEDULE | | | |(Regulation 6) | | | |NATIONAL LABOUR COMMISSION | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   COMPLAINT FORM A | | | |Complainant: †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã‚  Respondent: †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦. †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |Address: †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã‚  Address: †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦.. | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |Contact No. †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã‚  Contact No. †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |  Date: †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ 20†¦.. | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   COMPLAINT | | | |  Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢ € ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚ ¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |Relief Sought†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ | | | |Signed: †¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦. | | | |  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  COMPLAINANT | | | |  Ã‚     Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  JOSEPH A. ARYITEY | | | Chairperson, National Labour Commission | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |Date of Gazette notification: 17th March, 2006 | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | |   | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |more†¦ | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |   | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |   | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |Subscribe to our Newsletter | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |Name: | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |E-mail: | | | |[pic] | | | | | | |   | | | |[pic]unsubscribe | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |   | | | |   | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |   | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |News Events | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | |20/10/2009 | | | | | | | |ARBITRATION AWARD | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ ore | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |01/10/2009 | | | | | | | |ANNUAL REPORT – 2006 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ more | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |29/09/2009 | | | | | | | |ANNUAL REPORT – 2007 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ ore | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |29/09/2009 | | | | | | | |ANNUAL REPORT 2008 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ ore | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |13/10/2008 | | | | | | | |ARBITRATION AWARD – SGS LAB SERVICES GHANA LIMITED VRS MINEWORKERS UNION | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ ore | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |15/04/2008 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ ore | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |20/02/2008 | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |†¦ ore | | | | | | | |[pic] | | | | | | | |20/02/2008 How to cite Indicators of Employees Motivation, Papers

Sunday, April 26, 2020

Of Mice And Men...Book Vs. Movie Essays - English-language Films

Of Mice And Men...Book Vs. Movie Of Mice and Men: Movie Vs. Book The movie 1992 movie version of Of Mice and Men shows differences along with similarities to the book written by John Steinbeck. Differences were common mainly within the plot of the story. The first notable variation was in the beginning. The book started off with George and Lennie walking on a dirt road near a swamp while the movie started off with George on a train with a flashback. This shows how the movie differs by starting off in a different time frame than the book. Another case in point of a small but noticeable plot change was when Lennie kills the puppy. The book states that Lennie is sitting on the ground of the barn crying with the puppy lying in front of him. On the contrary, the movie shows Lennie standing up with the puppy in his hands pacing back and forth while worried yet not crying. Hence, the movie provides a different picture for the viewer than Steinbeck gives for the reader. In the last instance, which possibly shows the greatest contradiction between the two, is the ending. The novel illustrates the ranch workers coming and finding that George had just killed Lennie. Slim tries to comfort George while they move away from the scene as Carlton says ?Now what do ya ?spose is eatn' them two In sharp contrast to this, the movie ends with George on a train once again, possibly to make it a traditional denouement, and visualizing him working on the ranch with Lennie walking off into the sunset. Indeed, two completely dissimilar endings plot wise. Along with those differences there are aspects in the movie that show a strong resemblance to those in the book. For example, Lennie's characteristic of being childlike shows in the movie as well as in the novel. John Malkovich who plays Lennie does a great job at showing a glimmering expression on his face when he looks at George as well as a playful expression when he is playing with the puppies. This is parallel to Steinbeck's description of Lennie's facial expressions. By the same the token, Georg e's character keeps his characteristic of being a father figure towards Lennie. George, played by Gary Sinise, does this primarily with his tone of voice by varying it from strict, such as when he is scolding Lennie about Curley's wife, to more compassionate, for instance when he is cleaning the blood off Lennie's face after the fight with Curley. The tone characteristics coincide with those described in the same situations in the book. A correlation is shown between the book and movie as well with the basic mood of the story. The dismal ambiance is illustrated through George's look of helplessness and grief from Lennie's mistakes. The sense of a righteous closure is also felt at the end due to the fact that even though Lennie had been shot point blank by the only person in the world that had an ounce of care or affection for him, the feeling that it was the only suitable action for George to take resides in the movie in an almost equivalent way to Steinbeck's novel. To recapitulate , John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men possesses aspects of resemblance as well as discrepancy to the 1992 film version of the classic narrative. Book Reports

Thursday, March 19, 2020

As I Lay Dying essays

As I Lay Dying essays Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places My aloneness had been violated...by time, by love, by Anse(172). With these words, Addie Bundren describes a common theme in the South. Many women become trapped in an unsatisfactory life, and then drained, both physically and emotionally, by the people in their environment. In As I Lay Dying (1930), William Faulkner creates Addie and this theme of the novel through imagery, figurative language, and details, both before and after she dies. From the day she decides to take Anse (170) as her husband, Addie begins her lifelong journey of losing herself. That day, Addie realizes that my aloneness had to be violated over and over each day, (172) until the day that she dies. After she marries and gives birth to Cash, Addie knew that living was terrible(171). She does not enjoy being a wife and mother because her family cannot meet her needs. She did not experience love as a child, and longs to be loved and appreciated, but her husband and children cannot give such emotion. Once she realizes this, she feels as if he had tricked me, hidden within a word like within a paper screen and struck me in the back through it (172). While Addie lies on her deathbed, Anse resents her because he must pay for the doctors visit. He says, Making me pay for it, when she was well and hale as ere a woman ever were. One might think that Addies husband would realize the gravity of the situation, but once again her entire family reveals t heir true nature of selfishness. When Addie finally escapes her terrible life, she has been married for thirty years and raised five children. She lived, a lonely woman, lonely with her pride...and she was not cold in the coffin before they were carting her forty miles away to bury her, flouting the will of God to do it(23). The dysfunction of the Bundren family does not cease...

Monday, March 2, 2020

The Dos and Donts of Job Hunting While Youre At Work

The Dos and Donts of Job Hunting While Youre At Work One problem with job hunting when you work in an open office is the lack of privacy, which can be reminiscent of a college dorm. Since you can’t put up your own partitions, learning how to use stealth moves while job searching can help you. There are ways to practice your stealth without putting on a fake nose and eyeglasses while pretending to be a visitor to the office, and these tips can help you out. Handling Phone Calls at the OfficeSince you can’t hold a conversation with a recruiter using only words such as uh-huh or no, talking to a recruiter while at the office is not a good idea. It is a better idea to set your phone on voicemail, and give the recruiter a callback when you are somewhere else, whether it’s another part of the building or at a local cafe during lunch hour. The main point is to keep others in your office from knowing you are job searching, or the next person who finds out about it might be your boss.Using Company Phones or Other EquipmentI f you are using a company phone to receive or make phone calls about job listings, you might as well go ahead and put up a banner that says you are job hunting. Other employees might overhear those phone calls and deduce that you are job hunting. In addition, many employers monitor computer use in the event employees are playing on the Internet instead of working, and finding that an employee has been checking the job classifieds could be problematic. Don’t use company phones or emails to contact others about job openings. Instead, only use your personal phone number and email to job hunt.Keeping It PrivateWhile you may have friends among your coworkers, the fastest way for the news to get around that you are job hunting is to share that information in the office. If you feel you have a friend in the office whom you can absolutely trust, you should still think twice before taking that person into your confidence.Social Media MistakesEmployers frequently check social media emp loyee accounts, LinkedIn and other sites to see what employees are doing. If you have updated your profile or resume, it might end up reported back to your boss. Turning off features that broadcast updates and making your information private can help. Actively broadcasting that you are job hunting on social media websites is a bad idea and would be better left to private messaging only to individuals you trust.Advertising on Job BoardsAdvertising on job boards lets you job hunt while keeping your personal information private. While this may not be the best way to job hunt, since an employer has to actively search for someone with your qualifications, it is one way to keep the news that you are job hunting from the eyes of your current employer.Updating Your ResumeIf you need to update your resume and don’t want to post it to LinkedIn or other sites where this might be discovered, then do it in private on your home computer, of course. Apply directly to job sites or companies and include your new resume from home. The personal approach can take more time for you to find the right job but can receive more attention from employers who are really interested in your talents.Don’t Go to Interviews From the OfficeOne mistake job hunters make is that they make interview appointments from the office or take personal leave during the day. It can look suspicious when you normally dress in comfortable clothing for the office and one day show up wearing a suit for a lunch with a friend. Change of style in clothing can be a big clue that something is up. In addition, taking time off using the pretext of a doctor’s appointment is doing a disservice to your current employee. Schedule interview appointments for weekends or evenings when you are off and it will cause you less stress and help protect the fact that you are job hunting.Job hunting while employed in an open office atmosphere takes finesse and caution so the entire office doesn’t find out . TheJobNetwork offers an easier way to job hunt and not miss jobs for which you are qualified. After you fill out your qualifications and job interests, we search around the clock for positions that would interest you and send these job listings as email alerts. If you wish to be more proactive in your search, you can also look for employment yourself on the job site. Sign up with TheJobNetwork to let us do the job hunt for you.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Management of Organisations Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

Management of Organisations - Assignment Example 1.) Therefore, organisational performance should be measured. Assessing an organisation's performance also helps to determine whether or not the company has a clear mission (one that addresses the needs of a particular marketplace) and whether or not people on all levels of the organisation understand the mission. Assessing the performance also allows the organisation to review the mission statement and to determine if the mission is referenced when developing organizational strategies. Assessing an organisation's performance will help to determine the procedure and processes that are set in place and whether or not these are in compliance with federal, state, and local laws. Examining the current ethics compliance programs (if there is one) and the processes which are set in place to assess compliance with accounting and financial management system helps to determine if the system that human resource uses is effective. Examining how the organisation measures employee satisfaction and how it handles employee satisfaction and how the processes of accreditation and certification operate along with their effectiveness can be determined by the assessment of an organisation. These methods are just some way that a manager can assess internal environment of an organisation. organisation is service oriented and its focus is on the c... The organisation is service oriented and its focus is on the clients. Fitness First is the largest health club operator in the UK and Europe. Having grown from a single health club, twelve years later Fitness First has 1.2 million members in fifteen countries. There are 166 Fitness First clubs in the UK, which is the focus of this case study. They provide top-quality service and equipment at a value price in a non-intimidating environment. Regardless of an individual's current fitness status, they offer the opportunity to improve his/her fitness level.Fitness First strives to deliver its members the best experience each and every time he/she walks through their doors. It was found that the customer service to clients is impeccable. Through word-of-mouth, feedback, increased membership, etc. the assessment of this portion of the organisation was excellent. However, the assessment of employees, staff, and policies regarding staff were assessed, the results were not the same. The company pl aced much emphasis on meeting the needs of its clients which left a gap in meeting the needs of its employees. Perhaps by implementing Investors in People, the largest health club operator, which caters to people can also provide cater to their people (employee) and reach its objectives more effectively. Management 4 In order to improve the company's weaknesses, based on findings during the assessment, the company decided to invest in its staff and employees in addition to investing in its clients. Taylor & Thackwray, (1996:1), as cited in Scutt (1998) stated that, "Investment in equipment depreciates whilst investment in people appreciates". As this quote points out, investing in people will deliver a huge return.